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Dean Haspiel

History

13th April 2019

11:55am: Deadline Art
No comic book artist likes rushing their art. We discuss this in the studio. Do you know how many franchise comic book artists made the deadline, hell, even drew a whole comic in 2-weeks or a weekend (because another artist botched it up or a writer was late on the script) just to get dissed by readers and fans, protesting the artist from working on any given book again? It's sad. As a kid I didn't know about deadlines and pressure and rushed art. I just thought a sucky artist sucked. When, actually, they were better than that -- MUCH better than that -- given the time.

I'm sure there's a good reason comic books and periodicals had to be published on a regular basis, something to to do with distribution and keeping fans on the hook, but it never serves the creators. The entire creative assembly line of a group effort is forced to make shortcuts.

On the other hand, there IS an art to shortcut art. An art form I'm trying to master because I'd rather the reader turn pages than sit and stare and ogle my art. I've come to a certain sense of peace that my art ONLY serves the story (where image is text, too). To be honest, I don't know if I want to know what my art looks like given the time and space. And, at age 51 going on 52, I don't know that I care as much anymore.

Alas, comics can be anything. So, the creatives (including editorial) have to decide what is being produced before they set a proposed deadline. There's DAREDEVIL the monthly book (by Frank Miller & Klaus Jansen) and then there's LOVE & WAR (written by Frank Miller and painted by Bill Sienkiewicz). Both are great but created in different time frames with different goals. I worked with Sienkiewicz on The New Mutants and, even though the artwork was great, it was different than what he did on DAREDEVIL: LOVE & WAR, ELEKTRA: ASSASSIN, etc. Different deadlines and different goals for different projects in the same medium for the same industry.

Knowing what the project is supposed to be at the beginning helps dictate goals.
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