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Dean Haspiel

History

23rd September 2015

2:28pm: Graphic Novel Reporter reviews BEEF WITH TOMATO
Excerpts:

"Subtle nods to his muses sprawl naked across the page, like the exhibitionists from "Boy Loves Girl Hair." The art has a familiar, old school feel to it, but not for the sake of noir. It is indicative of the stark shadows of Alex Toth, the manic lines of Will Eisner, and even the grand scenery of Jack Kirby. In fact, Haspiel injects some of Kirby’s famous “crackle” in the final panel of “Awful George.”

"BEEF WITH TOMATO starts out with a stolen bicycle and a move to Brooklyn, continues with tales of whiskey-fueled nights in a post-9/11 NYC landscape, and ends with an essay about feeling at home wherever you are --- set against the backdrop of a bustling artist community in Upstate New York. Through it all, this strong semi-autobiographical work does what any book, regardless of premise or plot, should achieve: It asks the reader to identify. Haspiel expertly portrays a sense of self-inspection and a love for the world around us through his prose and his drawings, without ever losing a sense of wonder."

Read the entire review here: http://www.graphicnovelreporter.com/reviews/beef-with-tomato
2:31pm: ComicsDC interviews Dean Haspiel
Excerpts:

What is your training and/or education in cartooning?

The comic book rack on the newsstand at the corner of 79th street and Broadway in NYC was my comix kindergarten. Later on I discovered a steady flow of pop art pulp treasures at West Side Comics, opened a weekly account at Funny Business, and discovered American Splendor and Yummy Fur at Soho Zat. After that, any inklings of pursuing a normal life went out the window when dreams of drawing comix for a living took over and held my sway. I never learned how to draw comix in school because school didn't teach comix. School shunned comix. Comix taught me how to make comix. And, I'm still learning how, one panel at a time.

What do you think will be the future of your field?

Patronized digital comix produced one panel at a time; published one per day, delivered directly to your phone, and story arcs get collected into print (if necessary).

Read the entire interview: http://comicsdc.blogspot.com/2015/09/hang-dai-studios-dean-haspiel.html
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