Dean Haspiel

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Wednesday, April 22nd, 2015
5:12 pm - WhatchaReading reviews The Fox #1
Excerpts:
"Dark Circle Comics’ chapter one of Dean Haspiel and Mark Waid’s “The Fox” is a thing of beauty, a comic to behold, and a fine example of true artistry."

"At times Haspiel and Waid’s story reads like Ben Edlund’s sharp, super-hero satire “The Tick” and there are other moments that are filled with the charm of Will Eisner’s “The Spirit.”

"While Haspiel and Waid keep us on our toes, we’re never really quite fearful for our hero. The violence and threat comes across like the impending nature of doom one faces in a cartoon. Maybe it’s because of the pleasantness of Haspiel’s art, bringing to mind Chris Samnee’s work. (Samnee is one of the featured variant artists) But no matter what the situation, every beat works in chapter one of “The Fox.” I’ve heard many readers voice complaints over the events unfolding in other comic books and Dark Circle is perfectly situated while certain publishers converge and have their secret wars. Here is an attractively charming title with plenty of heart. It also invitingly opens up a new world of comic books that you may have been following or possibly not have known about.

Dark Circle Comics have a truly special series on their hands and one that deserves every bit of attention it could get. How often does a comic reader in today’s day and age have the opportunity to be in on the ground floor for a new, universe building story? Of all new characters! And ones that are actually well-written and adoringly rendered!"


Read the entire review: http://whatchareading.com/sharp-charming-fox-dark-circle-comics-fox-review/

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Tuesday, April 21st, 2015
12:59 pm - iZombie - episode 6 teaser art
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I had the great honor of drawing an iZombie teaser for episode 6 of the TV show. It was officially Tweeted here: https://twitter.com/CWiZombie/status/588748768759033856/photo/1

I've always been a fan (and now a friend) of Mike Allred, and I hope to honor more of his creations in the future.

Here are some other quick sketches I proposed for the teaser:

 photo IZOMBIE-Dino-sketch1_zpsqqr1ahp6.jpg

 photo IZOMBIE-Dino-sketch2_zps3l2x9cxy.jpg

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11:54 am - Wizard World Las Vegas
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I will be a guest at Wizard World Las Vegas this weekend, April 24 - 26, 2015. Come find me at Table A22.

More info here: http://www.wizardworld.com/home-lasvegas.html

I will have copies for sale of my new Billy Dogma magazine, HEART-SHAPED HOLE, including PSYCHOTRONIC COMIX, and the exclusive THE WALKING DEAD variant cover I drew. I will be available for illustration commissions and sign any comix I've done, including THE FOX, that you bring me. I'm also doing a couple of panels:

FRIDAY APRIL 24
5:00 - 5:45 CREATE-A-COMIC WITH 2 GUNS' STEVEN GRANT, THE FOX’S DEAN HASPIEL & SHE-HULK’S RENEE WITTERSTAETTER (ROOM S229)
Ever wonder what it would be like to collaborate on making comics with top professionals? In this fun-and-educational session, superstar writer Steven Grant (2 Guns; Whisper) and celebrated artist Dean Haspiel (The Fox; American Splendor) create a new character and story before your eyes, incorporating audience members' ideas and suggestions! Come see—and join in—the creative process! The panel will be moderated by longtime Marvel writer and editor Renee Witterstaetter (editor of She-Hulk and author of Excess: The Art of Michael Golden), who will show how an editor interacts with a writer and artist.

SATURDAY APRIL 25
1:30 - 2:15 FROM AGENT CARTER TO AVENGERS: AGE OF ULTRON (AND GROOT)! MARVEL COMICS AT 76—WITH THE PUNISHER’S STEVEN GRANT, THE FOX’S DEAN HASPIEL, AND PARANORMAL POP CULTURE’S AARON SAGERS (ROOM S233)
In 1939, Marvel Comics #1 debuted, unleashing The Sub-Mariner and The Human Torch on the world, and launching what would come to be known as the Marvel Universe. Steven Grant (The Punisher; 2 Guns), Dean Haspiel (Spider-Man; The Fox) and pop-culture expert Aaron Sagers (Paranormal Pop Culture; MTV) present an illustrated tour through the more than seven decades of the phenomenon that is Marvel, up to and including the upcoming blockbuster Avengers: Age of Ultron.

Looking forward to seeing you in Sin City!
--Dino

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Monday, April 20th, 2015
6:22 pm - Phil's Reviews reviews The Fox #1
Excerpt:
"Haspiel’s art looks like the product of some unholy union of Jack Kirby and Alex Toth"

http://allaboutbooksandcomics.com/wp/phils-reviews-stuff-i-bought-313/

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Sunday, April 19th, 2015
12:19 pm - Major Spoilers reviews The Fox #1
Excerpt:
"I’m glad to see The Fox hasn’t completely rebooted away from his last iteration, as it is both unique and fun to read, and the issue’s cliffhanger promises not only to bring back a wide array of MLJ villains, but to give us some excitement going into the first arc of the new series. The art is, as usual, excellent stuff, with Dean Haspiel delivering nuanced and entertaining art with great facial expressions (especially for Shinji) and nice use of action sequences. The indication seems to be that this is an older Fox, nearing the end of his career, and the care taken in showing that in the art is impressive."

Read the entire review here: http://majorspoilers.com/2015/04/19/the-fox-1-review/

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11:38 am - Paste: The 15 Best Vertigo Miniseries and OGNs of the Last 15 Years
Nice to receive a recent acknowledgement for The Alcoholic, my collaboration with Jonathan Ames, considered as one of the 15 Best Vertigo Comics from Paste Magazine:

The Alcoholic
Writer: Jonathan Ames
Artist: Dean Haspiel
Release Date: October 2008

"Midway through the last decade, Vertigo began branching out more aggressively into original graphic novels wholly unrelated to the dark fantasy genre most associated with the imprint. Novelist Jonathan Ames’ mostly biographical rumination on his struggles with alcoholism, writing, and love, brought to life by Dean Haspiel (also of Harvey Pekar’s excellent Vertigo offering, The Quitter) was one of the best results. With nary a supernatural element in sight, Vertigo proved it could publish affecting, literary standalone works at the same level as Pantheon and other boutique imprints at traditional publishers. Also: the creative duo would later be immortalized by Jason Schwartzman and Zach Galifianakis in the HBO comedic noir, Bored to Death."

http://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2015/04/the-15-best-vertigo-miniseries-and-ogns-of-the-las.html

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11:21 am - Horror Talk reviews The Fox #1
Excerpt:
"Haspiel's artwork is a great fit for the character, matching his nimble leaps and carefree attitude with a nostalgic flare. Paul looks like he's a man out of time, snatched from the World War II era and plopped into the present with a chiseled jaw and neatly parted hair. The Fox costume is simple, yet fitting. Seeing Paul jump into action once he puts on the mask gives you a great idea of his personality too."

Read the entire review here: http://www.horrortalk.com/reviews/comic-reviews/5439-the-fox-1-comic-review.html

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Friday, April 17th, 2015
9:06 pm - Newsarama reviews The Fox #1
Excerpts:
"Dean Haspiel and Allen Passalaqua go for the vintage gusto throughout this debut issue, rendering each setting and character as if they will inhabited the bygone era that Paul Patton, Jr. so desperately wants to return to. Haspiel’s heavily inked character designs coupled with Passalaqua’s naturalistic color palette give The Fox #1 the look of a old-school newspaper strip expanded across twenty-four pages. Though he doesn’t spend much time in costume, the Fox’s outfit also pops every time it is in frame, thanks in large part to Haspiel’s amazing masked expressions. The Fox’s costume has long since been a visual high point of this series and despite it not making too many appearances this time around, Haspiel and Passalaqua make the most of when we see it. Striking superhero costume design is few and far between nowadays, but The Fox has still got it, on top of a vintage comic look and feel.

And so, after an emotional first issue culminating in a declaration that will reverberate through the rest of the series, The Fox is back in shops in a big way this week. Dean Haspiel, Mark Waid, and Allen Passalaqua keep it simple for this return issue and the results are as effective as they are narratively satisfying. For too long as superhero’s family has been an object of derision or, even worse, a narrative excuse for torture, but The Fox takes a higher road and allows its main character’s family to function as an extension of him, giving The Fox #1 a layer of emotion that is often neglected in superhero comics. Paul Patton, Jr. is a family man first and a superhero second, and that is worth a thousand superpowers any day."

Read the entire review here: http://www.newsarama.com/24146-best-shots-reviews-thor-7-convergence-2-the-fox-fox-hunt-1.html

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3:13 pm - PopCultureMaven reviews The Fox #1
Excerpts:
"Haspiel’s art is a real treat and has a great feel of comics from the classic golden and silver age comics that you rarely see today."

"If you are looking for a fun superhero book then you have come to the right place. This is a book with really solid storytelling and great stylized art that make it a real treat. If you are looking for something that is both different and fun you have come to the right place."

http://www.popculturemaven.com/comics/new-comic-book-reviews-week-of-41515/

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Thursday, April 16th, 2015
3:54 am - Multiversity Comics interviews Dean Haspiel about The Fox
Excerpts:
"I’ve been dreaming of drawing a regular comic book series since I was 12-years old but I was never good enough to get hired for a job like that. So, I dawdled. Drew this and that. Finally decided to skip being sanctioned by professional editors and publishers and make my own comix. And, because I was influenced early on by C.C. Beck, John Byrne, Harvey Pekar, and Chester Brown, I became too indie-oriented for the mainstream and too mainstream-oriented for the indie crowd. So, I learned how to write because, frankly, drawing comix IS writing. I got interested in other things like movies and realized a regular series might not hold my attention. I always admired Stan Lee & Jack Kirby’s 102-issue run on The Fantastic Four, and other artists like Curt Swan on Superman and Jim Aparo on Batman, who put their definitive stamp on those characters. Nowadays, you’re lucky to keep a team together for six-consecutive issues. And, as I come to the end of drawing my ninth consecutive issue of The Fox and diving into my tenth, I’m just starting to get a familiar feel for the character. It’s something I’ve wanted to do for over 35-years and it’s something I’d like to continue to do for awhile."

"I miss inking with a brush but I felt that my thick style was blotting out some of the nuances I was discovering in my pencils. With ink, I was forfeiting details for simplicity. Normally I cherish a chunky, thick, round brush style akin to Dick Ayers, Joe Sinnott and Chic Stone on The Fantastic Four, but I also like some of the gritty, broken-line art I was doing when feeling spontaneous and loose. When frustrated, I sometimes draw something random in 5-minutes on a piece of scrap paper and usually like that better than an entire 22-page comic book I spent two months to craft. It bugs me that I can’t access that part of me on a constant basis. So, I try to do that for the covers, dragging my dry brush across the tooth of watercolor paper and allow for deliberate accidents to surface. It’s bold and pulpy. There is a sequence in “Fox Hunt” issue 4 that I just had to ink because the narrative begged for it. I hope I get to work on a future project (perhaps the next Fox story?) that will allow me the extra time for me to draw it with more scattered and blotchy ink."

"At first I was resistant to go “dark” on The Fox for Dark Circle. ‘Freak Magnet’ established a zany antihero where anything goes and the violence was more akin to Jack Kirby fisticuffs and laser blasts. By the second issue of “Fox Hunt,” I’ve illustrated exploding heads and blood-splattered costumes and it only gets more gruesome. I’ve claimed before that I don’t want my superhero stories to get subsumed by horror but we also live during a time where parents and their children cos-play as zombies slipping and sliding in their own intestines every other week at any given comicon. Gore has become the norm. So, the current culture expects a certain amount of entrails and trauma. I’m not a prude and horror is my favorite genre (someday I aim to write “The Poetics of Leatherface”), but I believe it’s important for the hero to stand tall, rise above the viscera and find the a will and a way to perform extraordinary feats of heroism against all odds sans murder."

Read the entire interview here: http://multiversitycomics.com/interviews/release-the-hounds-dean-haspiel-talks-the-fox-fox-hunt-1-interview/

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3:49 am - Omnicomic reviews The Fox #1
Excerpt:
"The Fox bounds through the pages with a litheness captured beautifully by Haspiel. He demonstrates an adeptness at rendering characters rife with bulging muscles and sharp, angled faces. Patton seems to be most comfortable as The Fox (despite his pangs of retirement) and Haspiel demonstrates him as such. Various poses by The Fox in particular cut sharply against the backdrops of the city and Haspiel's portrayal of a fight against a seemingly invisible foe sells the disadvantage for The Fox."

Read the entire review here: http://www.omnicomic.com/2015/04/review-fox-fox-hunt-1.html

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3:33 am - Comic News Insider #602, featuring Dean Haspiel
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Jimmy Aquino interviewed me about Billy Dogma and The Fox at MoCCA Fest 2015 for Comic News Insider #602: http://www.jimmyaquino.typepad.com/comicnewsinsider/2015/04/episode-602-mighty-mocca-merriment-w-dean-haspielseth-kushnerbarbara-stok-.html

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Wednesday, April 15th, 2015
6:13 pm - Uproxx reviews The Fox #1
Excerpt:
"It’s an oddly bittersweet start to an ongoing series, very much about fathers, sons, and the grip even a thin rind of the past can have on us. It’s not your typical superhero book, even with the fights, and it stands out because of it."

Read the entire review here: http://uproxx.com/gammasquad/2015/04/sabrina-the-teenage-witch-and-this-weeks-other-comics-of-note-ranked/

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1:09 pm - Den of Geek reviews The Fox #1
Excerpts:
"Written by Dean Haspiel and Mark Waid, with art by Haspiel, The Fox is a joyous romp that is immediately compelling. With the Fox and the rogue's gallery of supporting characters who appear within the pages, Waid and Haspiel have brought a familiar yet slightly off group of characters to the forefront. We've seen figures like these in comics many times before, though rarely with such self-aware glee. (While complaining about his acceptance of wearing the Fox's uniform under his street clothes, Patton contemplates a career move as a competitive dog groomer). The comedic touches keep the story flowing forwards, but behind the laughs is a subtle statement about the dangers of becoming overly nostalgic -- one that perfectly befits a reboot of a comic character who has been kicking around since 1940.

As great as the Waid/Haspiel writing team is, it's Haspiel's delighftul cartoonish art that shines here. Think the comic offspring of Ben Edlund and Mike Mignola and you've got a pretty good idea of Haspiel's visual style here, one that is heightened by gorgeous splash pages.

It may be a bit early to say so, but screw it, The Fox is a perfect comic that will prove to be amongst the year's best. Juggling humor, excitement and heart, it is an absolute pleasure to read. Paul Patton Jr. may be unhappy with his lot in life, but you'll love everything about it."

Read the entire review here: http://www.denofgeek.us/books-comics/the-fox/245453/the-fox-1-archie-comics-review

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11:28 am - Overmental reviews The Fox #1
Excerpt:
"If you like down to Earth superheroes with actual human problems (who make witty jokes about them), definitely check out The Fox #1. Dean Haspiel’s art is masterful, and he uses the photography background of The Fox and his son to craft “snapshot” panels that give you a closer look at how the characters are feeling during pivotal moments.

Dean Haspiel and Mark Waid also really dig into the idea of nostalgia through The Fox, and how the old days were pretty good, but that our memories are more important that preserving every nook and cranny of childhood. The corporation as villain has been used a lot in recent comics, but they wisely focus on the characters’ feeling and interpersonal relationships while throwing in an ample dose of sarcasm, sight gags, and an actual final page cliffhanger to keep the story entertaining."

Read the entire review here: http://overmental.com/content/fox-1-another-superhero-hit-archie-comics-13651

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11:27 am - Broken Frontier reviews The Fox #1
Excerpts:
"Haspiel and Waid share an obvious love of the Fox and infuse this latest fast-paced misadventure with a huge, fun-loving heart and loads of storytelling craft. On the surface, the intent may seem too simple or light on its feet to bear any real weight, but the pair layer the story with an undercurrent of introspection, centered on Paul’s dedication to his family, which lends the series its emotional heft."

"As Waid uses crisp, fluid dialogue to inject Patton with the requisite emotional complexity to prevent him from degenerating into nothing more than a middle-aged Peter Parker, The Fox’s tone remains light. Haspiel teams up with colorist Allan Passalaqua to create distinctive, eye-popping visuals that infuse the book with a kaleidoscopic, vibrant energy, matching the plot’s rambunctious pace stride for stride. The end result is a product of high craft and passion that appears deceptively elementary to the uninitiated."

Read the entire review here: http://www.brokenfrontier.com/fox-dean-haspiel-mark-waid-dark-circle-comics-archie-comics-review-superhero/

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11:24 am - Deadshirt reviews The Fox #1
Excerpt:
"Haspiel and Waid’s Fox is a stern-jawed legacy hero, a photojournalist trying to live up to his father’s example while taking care of his own family. He has a weariness to him, and he’s neither excited to see his childhood hometown demolished by corporate buyers, nor by the appearance of a supervillain to tangle with. Haspiel draws him rumpled and perturbed, like a cut-rate Batman or Daredevil. Still, the Fox is a capable hero, as evidenced by how many people have an axe to grind with him. The final scene, which sets up the overarching plot, features the Fox’s colorful dangerous rogue’s gallery called together for a bounty on his head. The use of bland smile iconography as a sinister, villainous motif is a solid choice, one that ties the banality of evil even more closely to corporate activities."

Read the rest of the review here: http://deadshirt.net/2015/04/15/your-deadshirt-new-comics-shopping-list-for-april-15th-2015/

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2:28 am - Nerdspan reviews The Fox #1
Excerpts:
"Haspiel’s figure work blends the best of the cartoony side of the comic book masters, and he is especially adept at using the reader’s mind as an extra brush to add a dimension to the action, like Alex Toth and Frank Miller. The staging in issue one is also reminiscent of Rob Guillory’s work in Chew, which will make the first issue feel especially fresh to fans of the prior series, as it seems to be a side of Haspiel that we haven’t seen before and reflects some cross-pollination from current cartoon art styles. Fans of recent cartoon art action series such as Chew, Rocket Raccoon, and Sexcastle should not leave The Fox on the racks. Fans of vintage superhero cartoon-styled art (Toth and Miller, also Kirby, Swan, Ditko, and Infantino) will have all their nostalgia buttons activated at the same time. It is a freeing experience to find another comic in which the creators know that the experience of it is in your head and not on the page and spend as much time on the layout and the direction and not on overworking the panels into an opaque mess. Instead of trying to translate a prose story to a comic book page, this comic leads with its visual choices, choosing sometimes to focus on the foreground by using minimalist backgrounds, or having objects break the gutters of the panels to extend their reach, or to become panels themselves, such as when this tarot card intrudes into the narrative."

"Composed of grabbing visuals, visceral tension between father and son, and romantic conflict between superhero and supervillain, The Fox #1 is a unique reading experience that will draw you back for a few re-readings, and it is a definite recommendation for your pull list this week."

Read the entire review here: http://www.nerdspan.com/the-fox-1-by-dean-haspiel-and-mark-waid-review/

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2:22 am - ComicBook.com The Fox #2 sneak-peek
"In the second issue of 'Fox Hunt,' I tried to slow things down and finally let The Fox hang up his superhero trunks so he could help improve his son's golf swing and macrame a community quilt with his wife for their local cauliflower festival. I really, really tried. But, that's not going to happen," said Haspiel.

http://comicbook.com/2015/04/14/exclusive-archie-comics-preview-the-fox-2/

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2:20 am - Bleeding Cool reviews The Fox #1
Excerpts:
"Fox Hunt #1 sets us up for a dark ride by the end of the issue as we begin to realize forces are gathering against the Fox despite his lack of intentional involvement in crimefighting. But one of the things that makes me confident that Fox Hunt is going to be as compelling, and most likely even more compelling, than the first Fox mini-series by Waid and Haspiel is the use of language. It’s hard-nosed, punchy, bullet-proof, and part of an almost jazz-like structure of narrative boxes tumbling through the panels forming a distinctive rhythm to the movement of the story. We hear Patton’s thoughts, his memories, his reactions, and they punctuate and harmonize with his movements in an interesting back and forth, giving the comic an energy in the tension between language and image that few comics, if any, utilize these days when it’s becoming all too common for the speech and the images in a comic to essentially “say” the same thing.

As Patton reflects on whether it’s ever possible to get your “innocence back” as someone from his past comments, he’s bruised, battered, and already wrestling his past to the ground in Fox Hunt #1. He’s the ultimate combination of noir detective, Marlowe-like beset by a world of troubles and the superhero with a target on his back for all the underworld he’s managed to cross in his lengthening career. Will he ever find out who he really is or wants to be? Fox Hunt is going to force Paul Patton to answer his own questions before others answer those questions for him in ways he may not like. The Dark Circle goes darker in Fox Hunt, and it’s going to show you a hero, and a man, under siege. His humor, his language, his versatility, are all going to be put to the test as the story, indeed, comes to him in very big ways. What starts as a trip down memory lane takes only moments to turn into a toxic punch-up, and that’s only the beginning of what’s in store for Paul Patton in Fox Hunt."

Read the entire review here: http://www.bleedingcool.com/2015/04/14/advance-review-a-punch-up-on-memory-lane-for-fox-hunt-1/

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